New Hardanger Fiddles

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The "Viking Fiddle"
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When you buy one of my Hardanger Fiddles ...

•        You get great sound.  In early July, 2018, I took my latest two instruments to three good American players. There was a difference of opinion as to which of the instruments was better, but all three players thought that both instruments were very good.

Later in July, I took the same two instruments to the annual workshop of the Hardanger Fiddle Association of America.  The two Norwegian teachers there tried the instruments and liked them.  The Norwegian teacher of the advanced class, a top player, played them for half an hour, going back and forth between them.  There was no clear decision as to which was better ...  but a half-hour of playing is a sign of great praise.  (And he asked for my card and my price)

•        You get fine construction.  The instruments are built with the materials, construction, and attention to detail of a quality violin.   Fine maple, spruce, ebony, mother-of-pearl and bone.  The pegs fit and work properly.  The fingerboard points down the middle of the instrument, and is smooth, even, and has proper scoop.  The bridge fits.  The sound-post fits and is in the right place.  And many other details.

•        Your instrument is ready to play without any adjustment.  And when it does need maintenance (because every instrument needs maintenance), you can take it in to your local luthier.  He or she may be hesitant to work on a strange instrument.  But the clear quality of the instrument will tell him he will find the glue, materials, and constructions methods that he is familiar with.

•        You get a beautiful instrument.  

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My current instruments are all very similar.  The most visible change is in the choice of geared pegs, ordinary pegs, and fine tuners.  I'm looking to see what works best for the player.

There are small changes in the rosing (pen and ink work) and the carving of the head.

There are small changes in the arching, thicknesses, and bass bar, all of which are important to the sound.